Historical names elements in languages: Albanian, Basque, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish, Italian, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Manx, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Rusyn, Scots, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Sorbian (Lower and Upper), Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian, Welsh ///// Modern Spanish


1788
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Pedro Gutiérrez Bueno

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1787PTFrench, 1788PTSpanish, 1791PTItalian, 1793PTGerman, 1796PTEnglish

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Pedro Gutiérrez Bueno převzal principy přechodu na nové vědecké názvosloví, když v knize Curso de Química přeložil v roce 1788 knihu Méthode de nomenclature chimique, která o rok dříve vyšla ve francoužštině a později v roce 1791 v italštině, v roce 1793 v němčině a v roce 1996 v angličtině.

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Juan Manuel Munarriz

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Traité élémentaire de chimie  is a textbook written by Antoine Lavoisier published in 1789 and translated into Spanish (Castilian) by Juan Manuel Munarriz  in 1798 under the title TRATATO ELEMENTAL DE QUÍMÍCA. It is considered to be the first modern chemical textbook. The book contains a list of 33 elements, only 23 of which are elements in the modern sense. The elements given by Lavoisier are: lightcaloricoxygen, azote (nitrogen), hydrogensulphur, phosphorous (phosphorus), charcoal, muriatic radical (chloride), fluoric radical (fluoride), boracic radical, antimonyarsenicbismuthcobaltcoppergoldironleadmanganesemercury, molybdena (molybdenite), nickel, platina (platinum), silvertin, tungstein (tungsten), zinclime, magnesia (magnesium), barytes (baryte), argill (clay or earth of alum), and silex.


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PT 18 A argón, 41 Cb columbio, 43 Ma masurio
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61 Ilinio
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Element 61 - Promethium was the last of the rare-earths family elements to be discovered. In 1902 the Czech chemist Bohuslav Brauner (1855-1935) improved Mendeleyev's period chart by extending it downward after Lanthanum. He predicted the existence of an element in between Neodymium and Samarium. Henry Moseley's study of X-ray spectra confirmed in 1913-14 that an element was missing at atomic #61. A search of minerals containing adjoining elements brought claims of discovery.

  • 1924: the Italian chemist Luigi Rolla (1882-1960) with the young graduate Lorenzo Fernandes (1902-1977) in Florence, Italy, claimed to have discovered element 61. In 1924 he had sent a sealed envelope to the Royal Accademia dei Lincei in Rome containing his results on identification of element 61. He named it Florentium (Florenzio), symbol Fr (not Fl as it is often reported in scientific journals), after Florence in Italy.
  • 1926: B. Smith Hopkins (1873-1952) and his coworkers Len Yntema and a Canadian graduate student named Harris of the University of Illinois-Urbana reported its discovery and suggested the name Illinium, (symbol Il) after the American state of Illinois. But other chemists, as the rare-earth specialist Wilhelm Prandtl (1878-1956) and Walter Noddack and Ida Tacke Noddack (1896-1979), discovers of Rhenium, were unable to confirm this new element.
  • 1938: Laurence L. Quill (1901-1989) and colleagues used the new Ohio State cyclotron to bombard Neodymium and Samarium with various projectiles. A number of radioactive isotopes were produced, presumably including one due to element #61 for which they proposed the name Cyclonium.
  • 1942: Element #61 probably made by Chien Shiung Wu, Emilio G. Segrè et Hans Albrecht Bethe during a bombardment of Neodymium and Praseodymium with neutrons. Chemical proof was lacking because of the difficulty in separating the rare earths from each other at that time.

Isolation and identification of element #61 was finally made in 1945 (confirmed 1947) by Charles D. Coryell (1912-1971) and his associates Jacob (Jack) A. Marinsky (b. 1918) and Lawrence E. Glendenin (1918-?), together with Harold G. Richter. They worked for the Manhattan Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where scientists had to create the fuel for an atomic bomb. They identified 61 in the by-products uranium fission. Element #61 emitted beta rays with a 3.7-year half life. 61 was confirmed by mass spectrograph. The most stable isotope currently known has a half-life of 25 years, too short to be in any of the minerals investigated in the 1920s.


1940

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1959
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99 athenium

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La tabla del MAE es una rareza. En la casilla 99 aparece un elemento de símbolo An, lo que chocará a cualquier alumno que visite el museo. Entonces, ¿cuál es el origen del An? En 1950, el físico norteamericano, Luis Walter Álvarez, impartió una conferencia en Oxford en la que sugirió la posibilidad de que los elementos 99 y 100 pudieran ser sintetizados mediante una serie de reacciones. La noticia publicada por la prensa española, francesa y rusa señalaba que Álvarez había descubierto estos elementos. Rápidamente empezaron a circular propuestas para nombrarlos, entre ellos centurium (Ct) para el 100 y athenium (An) por Atenas, la capital de Grecia donde la idea del átomo como pieza fundamental de la materia había surgido.


1961
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Historical names elements in languages: Albanian, Basque, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German, Hungarian, Icelandic, Irish, Italian, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Manx, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Rusyn, Scots, Scottish Gaelic, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Sorbian (Lower and Upper), Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian, Welsh ///// Modern Spanish


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